LORD OF THE FLIES  by William Golding
 
In this course, we will study William Golding's Lord of the Flies .  All of the unit assignments are here, as well as many helpful links.
Background Knowledge

* Sparks Notes video summary

*  Mojo Top 10 Notes 

Chapter 1
Chapter 7
Chapter 2
Chapter 8
How to insert quotes  when answering a question, such as ...
 
C ite an example of Steinbeck using animal imagery .
 
When George and Lennie are first introduced in chapter one, they are walking down a path to a creek.  Steinbeck says Lennie  "walked
heavily, dragging his feet a ittle, the way a bear drags his paws” (3). 
Steinbeck compares Lennie to a bear for a number of reasons.  Firstly, it describes Lennie’s movement, the way he slowly plods along behind George.  Secondly it conveys Lennie’s great size and strength and thirdly, it hints that although Lennie may look gentle and placid, and if fact, be like an animal that is simple-minded and innocent, he is potentially dangerous and capable of great violence.
 
What do you learn about Curly in this chapter?

When Curly meets Lennie for the first time, George tries to protect Lennie and speak for him, but Curley seems to want to confront Lennie directly.  Clearly he is aggressive and quick to fight or quarrel: "Curley lashed his body around. 'By Christ, he's gotta talk when he's spoke to. What the hell are you gettin' into it for?'" (42).  The verb ‘lashed’ suggests that Curley moves quickly and dangerously like a bullwhip and is more than capable of causing pain.  He is hostile and appears to be looking for an excuse to start a fight.

What kind of relationship exists between Lennie and George?

It is clear George is almost a father figure for Lennie; he gives Lennie advice and tries to teach Lennie how to look out for himself.  George acts responsibly and he takes care of Lennie who does not seem to be able to live on his own.  Early in chapter one, the relationship is clearly outlined when Lennie drops to his knees to drink from a pool of water.  George lectures him as a father would:  “You never oughta drink water when it ain't running, Lennie.” 



What is one way Steinbeck hints at the general attitude towards Curley's wife?

Curley’s wife is disliked by most of the ranch men.  Steinbeck’s description of her reveals this when she arrives at the bunkhouse: "The rectangle of sunshine in the doorway was cut off."   This metaphor creates an image of the sunlight being extinguished by Curley’s wife, casting a dark shadow over the men in the bunkhouse.  Here Steinbeck hints to the reader that she may be the cause of trouble in the future.
  

  



 
/#content-header
 
 
 
 
Chapter 3
Chapter 9
Introduction
 
Quote
 
Explanation
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Introduction

Quote

Explanation




 
 
 
 
Explanationtion



Introduction

Quote






Introduction

Quote

Explanation

 
 
 
 









I
Chapter 4
Chapter 10
Chapter 5
Chapter 11
Chapter 6
Chapter 12
Final Project
Mini Assignment 1
Mini Assignment 4
Mini Assignment 2
Mini Assignment 5
Mini Assignment 3
Mini Assignment 6